First Mellon Dissertation Fellows Selected

graduate schools across the United States.

subject: Mellon Dissertation Fellowships
Mellon Fellowships
Fellowships
research in original sources

CLIR Press Release

NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release: April 11, 2002

Contact: Gerald George 202-939-4757

First Mellon Dissertation Fellows Selected

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The first recipients of Mellon Dissertation Fellowships
for Research in Original Sources in the Humanities were announced today by Deanna
B. Marcum, president of the Council on Library and Information Resources
(CLIR). Eleven fellows have been selected from among 128 eligible applicants in 53
graduate schools across the United States.

“We are grateful,” Ms. Marcum said, “to all who applied and to the committee
of distinguished scholars, librarians, and archivists who labored diligently
and conscientiously to evaluate the applications. So many were worthy that the
selection was extremely difficult.”

A grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is enabling CLIR to award
about 10 dissertation fellowships in each of three years beginning in 2002. Each
fellowship provides up to $20,000 to support dissertation research for a maximum of 12
months. The purposes of the program are to

  • help doctoral candidates who may otherwise not have opportunities
    or encouragement to work in original source materials in the humanities
  • help doctoral candidates in many humanities fields deepen their ability
    to develop knowledge from original sources
  • enable doctoral candidates to prepare dissertations on what seems to them
    and their faculty advisors most worthwhile by going where the relevant sources
    are rather than where financial support may be available
  • provide insight from researchers into how scholarly resources can be developed and
    made accessible in the future.

On May 6, before beginning their research, the fellows will meet in Washington, D.C., for a
workshop to increase their understanding of archives, libraries, and other original-source repositories and
how to work effectively with them. Following the fellowship-supported research, fellows will meet
again to report on their experiences and make recommendations for how original-source repositories
and scholars can work together more effectively.

Eligibility required that each applicant be enrolled in a doctoral program in the humanities in a
U.S. graduate school, complete all doctoral requirements except the dissertation by the start of
the fellowship tenure, be ready to start research no later than September 2002, and plan to work
primarily in the holdings of archives, libraries, museums, historical societies, and related repositories.

By September 2002, information and application forms for the fellowship competition for 2003 will
be posted on CLIR’s Web site: www.clir.org. Announcements will be sent to all U.S. graduate schools.

The 2002 Mellon Dissertation Fellows, their schools, and their fields are:

Sinan Antoon, Harvard University, Arabic literature

Brenda Foley, Brown University, interdisciplinary studies (history, theatre, women’s studies)

Christiane Gruber, University of Pennsylvania, art history

Angela Herren, CUNY Graduate Center, pre-Columbian art history

Drew Hopkins, Columbia University, cultural anthropology

Daniel Neely, New York University, ethnomusicology

Susan Pearson, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, United States history

Alisha Rankin, Harvard University, history of medicine

Maria Rose, New York University, musicology

Natalie Rothman, University of Michigan, anthropology and history

Paula Saunders, University of Texas at Austin, anthropology

The Council on Library and Information Resources is an independent, nonprofit organization
that works to expand access to information, however recorded and preserved, as a public good.
In partnership with other organizations, CLIR helps create services that expand the concept of
“library” and supports the providers and preservers of information.