CLIR Announces Awards for New Publication Series

CLIR today announced award recipients for its new “Pocket Burgundy” publication series. The series, which derives its name from the deep red covers of CLIR’s traditional research reports, will focus on shorter pieces—20 to 50 pages—addressing current topics in the information and cultural heritage community.

A review committee selected the following five proposals out of twenty-seven received:

The Chinese Archive: A Pocket Manual
Matthew Wong Foreman, Northwestern University
Yasser Ali Nasser, University of Chicago

A Green New Deal for Archives
Eira Tansey, University of Cincinnati

Remotely Useful: Practical Lessons for Northern Community Archiving
Morgen Mills, Memorial University
Mark David Turner, Memorial University/Nunatsiavut Government and OKâlaKatiget Society

The Story of the Modern Seed Library: A Historical Analysis of Seed Libraries, their Evolution Through the Ages, and Their Current Impact on Community, Culture, and Connection
Jennifer K. Embree, Binghamton University
Neyda V. Gilman, Binghamton University

Values-Forward Praxis: Data Science, Machine Learning, and Artificial Intelligence in Cultural Heritage Organizations
Thomas Padilla, Center for Research Libraries
Elizabeth Lorang, University of Nebraska­–Lincoln
Rebecca Dikow, Smithsonian Institution
Jefferson Bailey, Internet Archive
Ryan Cordell, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
Harish Maringanti, University of Utah

Each project will receive a $2,500 subvention. Reports will be completed by December 2022 and will be published in the second and third quarters of 2023. Publications will be made available free of charge on CLIR’s website.

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