Preservation and Archives in Vietnam

by Judith Henchy
February 1998

 

1. N? is the Sinitic or demotic script that was the first written form of Vietnamese. It was the script of vernacular literature from possibly as early as the eighth century, and was commonly used into the early twentieth century.
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2. Quoc ngu (?national script?) is the romanized form of the written language, attributed to Alexandre de Rhodes, who published the first Vietnamese-Latin-Portuguese dictionary in 1651.
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3. Cadi?e, L. and Pelliot, Paul. ?Premi?e ?ude sur les sources Annamites de l?histoire d?Annam. Bulletin de l?˜£ole Fran?ise d?Extr?e Orient 4, no. 3 (1904): 617-671.
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4. Colonial-era records of some of these social and political groups are available in the French archives. Foreign researchers are currently denied access to the records of the Republic, which now reside in the National Archives II in Ho Chi Minh City.
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5. Further research also needs to be carried out on the status of archives of the Catholic Church in Vietnam.
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6. Catalogue du fonds indochinois: livres vietnamiens imprim? en quoc ngu, 1922-1954. Paris: Biblioth?ue nationale, 1991; and Poitelon, Jean-Claude, Catalogue des pœGiodiques vietnamiens de la Biblioth?ue nationale. Ed. sur microfiches. Paris : Biblioth?ue nationale, 1993.
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7. A three-volume inventory of the h? and n? documents i n the Sino Nom Institute and other repositories in Hanoi was published in 1993, Di san Han Nom Viet Nam: thu muc de yeu. Hanoi: Khoa hoc xa hoi, 1993.
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8. The Australian National Library has agreed to load these records, with the permission of the National Library of Vietnam.
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9. The project in Hoi An met with additional problems after the 1997 restructuring of province boundaries, and it is now suspended.
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